Blogs

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Effects Of Alzheimer’s Disease On The Brain

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most common forms of dementia. Many people wonder if Alzheimer’s disease is preventable. Based on extensive research, many factors contribute to the development of the disease. This includes environmental factors, genetics, age, and existing medical conditions. Many risk factors, like genetics and age, can’t be changed.

old and young woman

How to Reduce The Risk Of Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most common forms of dementia. Many people wonder if Alzheimer’s disease is preventable. Based on extensive research, many factors contribute to the development of the disease. This includes environmental factors, genetics, age, and existing medical conditions. Many risk factors, like genetics and age, can’t be changed.

Unraveling Alzheimer’s: Confronting the Effect on Mortality

Today, Alzheimer’s is one of the most prevalent diseases in America, affecting about 11.3% of all people aged 65 years and over. In 2021, there were about 6.2 million people with Alzheimer’s, with the number expected to more than double and reach 13 million by 2050 should a cure not be found. It typically affects the seniors, with 72% of the 6.2 million people living with Alzheimer’s being over 75 years old.

Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Accessibility: A Need for Earlier Diagnosis and a Better Life

In 2021, more than 6 million people were living with Alzheimer’s in the US. This number is projected to more than double to over 13 million by 2050. Despite the exceedingly high number of Alzheimer’s patients, the cost of diagnosis and treatment is also very high, making it one of the costliest ailments in the world. As a result, proper diagnosis and treatment are way off the reach of thousands of Americans, with this number also projected to rise.

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Alzheimer’s and the Benefits of Early Diagnosis

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, more than 6 million Americans aged 65 years and older live with Alzheimer’s. This number is expected to more than double, hitting about 13 million people by 2050. This translated to about one in nine people over the age of 65, or 11.3% of Americans have dementia. And the numbers are just as staggering around the globe.